Catelas: a Divining Rod for your Discovery Efforts


Today’s post comes to you from Matt Berg who wrote a fantastic article (here) about Catelas. Matthew Berg is the Director of IT at Wolf, Greenfield & Sacks, P.C., a boutique Intellectual Property firm in downtown Boston.  Matt is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy and has a broad background in driving and supporting emerging technologies earned over the past 18+ years while fulfilling such roles as software developer, systems integrator and program manager.

INTRODUCTION

What if a vendor told you it could boil down a client’s document discovery production to “the five people you want to focus on first”? Or even better, “two key conversations” among those five people? And all within 24 hours? Sound like something out of Leonard Nimoy’s “In Search Of”?

Catelas’ eponymous product (see here) uses a proprietary algorithm to determine the relationships between parties involved in electronic communications, as well as the critical conversations being conducted by those parties.

And all of that before the first search term or keyword is even brought into play.

EARLY CASE INTELLIGENCE (OR ASSESSMENT) IN ACTION

Catelas is in my opinion the most intriguing player in the burgeoning “early case intelligence” (aka “early case assessment”) market. Catelas provided me with the following metrics from a recent case at an AmLaw 200 firm in Boston:

•           20,000 employee client, 3 million email log entries were ingested in 2 hours

•           15 individuals were identified as ‘key custodians’

•           80 ‘hot’ documents were tagged for senior executive review

•           Early Case Intelligence Report was provided to the client within 24 hours

Catelas was able to help counsel by defensibly reducing the collection of data. After a quick review of the reduced production set, the firm’s litigation team identified some risk. Based on these findings, they devised a strategy for their client to resolve the matter early through negotiation. A process that normally might have taken weeks (or months) took about a day.

HOW EARLY CASE INTELLIGENCE FITS INTO YOUR IT ENVIRONMENT

Catelas add value at the extreme left of the Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM). It does not necessarily replace any of the existing functions (you’ll still need products like Concordance, LiveNote, etc. to manage and review documents, email, and transcripts), but it streamlines and adds relevance to these documents, saving significant costs downstream in the discovery process.

From an identification perspective, the approach helps to identify the key custodians before collection even occurs. This early identification has obvious implications for Legal Holds (whose data to preserve). The intelligence provided via the “hot” documents identified can be used to help counsel define and agree on high level case strategy, including keyword determination, interview lists, lines of questioning, etc.

HOW CATELAS WORKS: SORT OF LIKE “LAW AND ORDER”

As we can see from the case metrics above, the value of Catelas is clearly up-front case intelligence. The claim is not so much to “find intelligence that others tools cannot find,” but to pinpoint that intelligence dramatically more quickly and more effectively than traditional methods.

So what makes Catelas different? Catelas describes its methodology as following the approach that law enforcement has used for years — linking people to the scene of a crime based on association and proximity (relationships, timelines, and locations) rather than relying on keywords to cull down the dataset. A detective would not gather 500 people within the immediate radius of a crime-scene and interview them with 10 identical questions (which is essentially the way ediscovery works through the use of keyword searching).

The technology Catelas employs to perform these analytics is based upon behavioral science and network analysis. A variety of communications data (email, telephony, SMS, IM, etc.) can be ingested, but the starting point is often email log files. All email servers have these logs, which audit every single email communication into and out of a company.

It may sound like I’m talking about terabytes or even petabytes of data, but that is not the case because these logs contain no email content. Catelas uses this metadata to construct Relationship Maps showing how people are linked. Email is not simply counted between individuals to determine the strength of a relationship. There is much more to it than that — and that is where Catelas’ “secret sauce” comes into play and the folks at Catelas start to get a bit close-mouthed.

Having identified the key people involved, based on their relationships, the collection process (native email files, cell phone records, etc.) can be precisely attuned to key individuals, timelines, and conversations. Catelas then ingests the relevant native files and identifies and tags the priority or “hot” documents as part of its Early Case Intelligence report.

It’s not called “early” case intelligence by accident. Catelas is able to go into a new client, take a copy of its log files, and have Case Intelligence Reports available within 1-2 days.

WHAT ABOUT THE COMPETITION?

In the process of researching this BigLaw column, I was unable to find any true competitors of Catelas (though maybe I’ll hear from a few after publication). There are a handful of vendors out there advertising similar functionality. For example, Fios’ Case Intelligence and LexisNexis’ Early Data Analyzer use similar language to describe some of their offerings. But to my knowledge neither uses the same approach as Catelas.

MY VERDICT

Catelas can help your litigators (and clients) become more informed, earlier in the discovery process. In a traditional model, the litigation process is iterative — intelligence is obtained piece by piece, often over a period of many months. But Catelas is fast-tracking that process to prevent surprises downstream. Its early intelligence helps to reduce risk and provide opportunities to negotiate earlier. The business model that Catelas uses is also flexible — use it on a case-by-case basis or deploy it in-house on a licensed basis. The next time you have a big discovery project (probably weekly given where you work), consider giving Catelas a test drive early in the process.

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Insider Trading: “The Circle of Friends”


The FBI continues to escalate their crackdown on Wall Street with their latest bust on hedge fund portfolio managers and analysts. This week seven friends have been charged with running a $62million insider trading scheme (see here).

The seven charged worked for five different hedge funds and investment firms and reaped nearly $62million in illegal profits on trades in Dell Inc, the prosecutors said.

This is eerily similar to the Galleon case and should not come as a surprise. There are numerous white collar crime cases where friends have been working in cahoots with one another. The Russian trader at UBS using “potato code” also springs to mind.
The fact is (and Catelas has been saying this for over 3 years now) that criminals cannot work in complete isolation. They need to work with trusted accomplices. Trust is gained through the building of relationships. And, it is unlikely that you will commit a crime with someone you do not trust, someone with which you have a tight bond, or strong relationship.
That is why at Catelas our fundamental premise is uncovering relationships. Our assumption is that a “circle of friends” committing a crime will not necessarily provide incriminating evidence in a email exchange. Sometimes people do make mistakes, but the thing that links these individuals is the communication exchanges they had (email, cell phone, SMS, IM, etc) lomg before the crime was committed. During the time these relationships were getting stronger. In fact, often we find that communications go “radio silent” leading up to the crime.
So our approach is rooted in Behavioral Science – we uncover communication patterns that mimic what behavioral science calls “shared experiences”. Its similar to going on a weekend camping outing with friends. Here a group of people participate in a shared experience (ie camping). After the weekend, this group will by definition have a stronger bond, having participated in a shared experience. Catelas has been able to apply this same approach to everyday business (and personal) communications. I cannot share the details of how we do it, but the results are astounding.
Our Relationship Analytics approach is used to first identify the people involved in or close to a particular investigation or case. These relationships leads us to critical conversations (topic or timeline related), which enables us to point the investigation, with laser focus, to the relevant people and the relevant documents.
The next time you are working a case and your question is: “Who else might be involved?”, think trusted relationships. For more information take a look at our website or contact me.
Rob.
(robert.levey@catelas.com)

FCPA – coming to a mid-sized company near you! Thanks for the interview, Mike Volkov!


Having read blogs for close to 5 years now, I always look forward to this time of year when predictions are made. I tend to select my reading based on subject matter expertise and style, focusing on people I like and respect. I have also learned to leave the predictions to the experts rather than making my own!

Last week at Catelas we interviewed Mike Volkov to gain his insights into FCPA Compliance and try to get a sneak peak into 2012. If you have not already read his blog (here) I highly recommend that you do. We thought we would share a 3 minute audio clip of our interview with Mike,which covers many of the same topics, but reinforces the message through our auditory senses. I hope we played a small part in helping Mike compile his thoughts.

One key prediction that resonated with me was “FCPA coming to a mid-size company near you”. Okay, this is a play on words, but the gist was that FCPA enforcement will expand beyond large multi-national companies and into mid-size or smaller public companies. These companies, who for the large part I assume do not have the people or money resources to handle these types of inquiries, will need some help. Both in the form of advice from people like Mike Volkov but also in the form of “audits or assessments” of where to start and what to prioritize from companies like Catelas.

For example: Mid Size company  – 20% of their business (and growing) comes from China. Step 1 and Priority 1 is to understand how the company does business in China, in particular understanding the relationships it has with its Partners and 3rd Parties in China.

Our interview goes on to discuss how resource-sensitive companies can use Catelas in a very targeted and cost-effective way – ie pinpointing the relationships they have in high-risk FCPA countries where they do business that is of importance to them.

I hope you enjoy the audio clip. Feel free to contact me if you want to listen to the full webcast or discuss the topic in more detail.

Rob (robert.levey@catelas.com)

Are you concerned about Social Media litigation?


This article by Kate Hodgkiss about avoiding Social Media Lawsuits provides some common sense advice for companies navigating the potential pitfalls of what their employees say on Facebook, Twitter et al. Another one I read was by Stacy Gulik titled “Think Before You Tweet: Risks Health Care Professionals Face With Social Media”.  She talks about the risks that Doctors (and others) face when tweeting about medical information or their profession in general. Then there was this spoliation charge of $700,000 for the destruction of Facebook pages.

Virtually every business in the world should be concerned about what their employees are tweeting about or posting on Facebook as it relates to their business. And the litigation is certainly heating up.

I used to say to my employees “don’t write in an email what you don’t want your boss to read or what you would not want to be read back to you in court”. Well the same is becoming true of social media. Companies have to deal with social media whether they like it or not – with about a billion Facebook users, I think its a fair guess to say social media is here to stay and is rapidly infusing corporate life. From the Medical Doctor who blogs about “her day in the office” to the disgruntled employee who Facebook’s a picture of his company’s “crappy working conditions”.

This is not to say that we have to come up with brand new answers to these issues. Just like when office email first arrived, employees needed training and guidance – eg “never send an email when you are angry, or sleep on it”. What is different is that the current generation of employees has been brought up in a world of “one to everyone”, instant communications. When we hit the post or publish button, it’s gone instantly. There is no permanently delete button. And the message did not just go to internal employees, it went to the world. Someone has likely read it and saved a copy of what was said, before the individual has had a chance to erase the “mistake”.

Clearly for some companies this is a bigger concern than it is for others and every company will embrace social media slightly differently. Because the root of what we do at Catelas is about people and their relationships, how people are interacting on social media is of huge interest to us. Just as it is not possible to collect and review every document in a litigation case today, the proverbial haystack has just become exponentially larger with social media. It is never going to be practical to collect and review everything posted on the social media.  But if you can quickly isolate the people involved and limit the search to only those people that are relevant, then following their social media footprints, has just become a whole lot easier. Of course good corporate policies and employee education never hurts.

How is your company or your clients handling what its employees are saying on social media?

Pharma’s in the cross-hairs – turning up the heat!


There seems to be a lot of heat in the Pharma compliance kitchens right now with a series of federal investigations and settlements. Stephanie Rabiner’s blog post summarizes the recent activity –  “Glaxo pays $3B fine, Pfizer paid $2.3 billion in 2009, while Eli paid $1.4 billion the same year. And Abbott Laboratories agreed to a $1.3 billion settlement in recent weeks.”

These cases center around fraud, off-label promotions and/or kickbacks and many go back over the last 10 years. Viewed holistically and considering the consumer suits that accompany these federal one’s, it is a very big deal. The Pharma Industry is certainly in the cross-hairs right now. And the heat is being turned up.

Another blogger, Richard Cassin, last month wrote about “a flock of Pharmas”, asking the question, was the Pharma industry simply prone to these types of investigations, given the business they are in?

The allegations being investigated are certainly broad – the illegal marketing of a number of drugs, de-frauding the Medicaid program, FCPA violations, to name a few. Is this the culmination of the big investigations or is this the tip of the ice-berg?

I also looked a little closer into the Pfizer case, started by a whistle-blower lawsuit. Turns out that the list of 10 whistle-blowers includes two former employees who had spent 24 years and 16 years respectively with Pfizer.  Long careers certainly, long memories, perhaps? This is not to say that the industry is inherently corrupt, but like the financial services industry, which was placed under massive scrutiny following Madoff, these types of investigations force every company in the industry to look in the mirror.

Given the revelations coming out of Penn State University this week, I would say that every Compliance Officer should be looking a little harder into their company’s Ethics programs to be sure that their company is not the next big Wall Street head-line.

How well do you know your Partners and 3rd Parties?


Reading through the Mike Volkov and Tom Fox blogs certainly provides food-for-thought around FCPA violations and infringements. Mike is holding a webinar next week to talk about FCPA with respect to Private Equity and Hedge Funds, in particular when such companies are considering international mergers or acquisitions; Tom talks about whether FCPA scrutiny revolves around the oil and gas company because of the places where they operate or the ‘cowboy tradition’ of the industry.

These articles got me thinking about the partners and 3rd parties that such companies contract with to conduct business in countries like Russia, China and Mexico. My question for companies with significant international operations is simply “How well do you really know your Partners and 3rd Parties?” I posed a similar question in my blog last month, but the point is worth repeating.

Most companies it seems, who are expanding their international businesses or looking at potential M&A activity, do a pretty good job at the front end – ie the due diligence stage. Vetting partners, 3rd party relationships, etc. The problem is that business relationships are not static – they change and evolve. Personnel changes, from sales to research and development teams to supply chain partners. With these changes, so does ‘who we do business with’ and more importantly ‘how business is conducted’.

At Catelas we are not advocating that companies need to monitor every business relationship every minute of the day, but we certainly recommend regular check-ups (or assessments). For example, a company might be have expanded its business operations into South America. Well it would not hurt to conduct a business partner / 3rd party assessment after 1 year to examine what those business relationships look like. Or a major pharma company conducting clinical trials in Indonesia may find it makes sound business sense to identify the key relationships that exist between the company, partners, 3rd parties and hospitals, six month into those trials.

As this picture shows, these 360 degree assessment need not be a massive, expensive investigation in-country. Nor is it a major audit of the company’s financials and partnership contracts. Rather they are designed to be a non-obtrusive examination of how  business is really being done on a day-to-day basis – ‘who is talking to who’, and ‘what are the key business relationships in place’. It provides first and foremost ‘peace of mind’ that the company is conducting business ethically. But if red flags are raised as a result of the assessment, then it provides a process for undertaking a more detailed examination.

And hence the MRI analogy we have used before – the Catelas 360 degree assessment provides an MRI into your foreign business operations – answering the question “How well do you know your 3rd parties?”. To learn more take a look here or give us a call. I would love to hear your views.

Early Case Assessment and The Cloud


A few weeks ago I wrote about the Early Case Assessment Trap and today as I was following the goings-on at the annual ACC get-together, it reminded me of our legal industry buzz-words and how vendors constantly re-invent themselves around the latest buzz. No doubt this week “cloud” will be hot  and “ECA” will still be generating a lot of noise.

The way I see ECA being applied is that the C stands for Cost not Case. Opposing Counsels get together and agree the scope of discovery based on the anticipated cost of the “document hit count” arising out of the agreed keyword terms.

Now granted, this is an over-simplification of a complex legal process and sure ECA means many things to many people. But, what we are not seeing is good, honest work being done in the early stages of a case to truly understand things like, who is involved, what is the company risk or exposure, is their sufficient evidence, what action should we be taking?

“Early Cost/Case Assessment” can quite easily become a template for “how much is this going to cost us” and “can we settle for less”.

At Catelas, because of the “buzz-word effect” which tends to make all vendors appear equal, we have shied away from calling ourselves an Early Case Assessment solution, for this very reason. We prefer to be thought of as Early Case Intelligence, where we endeavor to answer these key questions – who is involved, what was said and what action should the company take? We are trying to provide real, upfront intelligence to the client that helps them make smart decisions about the case, going forward. At then end of the day, Counsel does not want to be surprised with a “gotcha” six months into the case. Our mission is to ensure that Counsel gets “One Step Ahead” by providing key intelligence about the case within the first couple of days.

So this year at the ACC Annual Meeting, Early Case Intelligence may not [yet] be an industry buzz-word, but watch this space…

If you want to find out more check out this preso

Internal Investigations continue to rise


The latest Fulbright & Jaworski Litigation Trends Survey is out – slightly less litigation in 2011 compared to 2010, yet the cost of litigation per company rose. However, regulatory actions and internal investigations are climbing.

The report also reveals that whistle-blowers remain a concern in the coming year stating that one-quarter of respondents anticipate an increase in the number of claims or lawsuits brought by whistle-blowers next year. This year, 22% of respondents said their organizations were subjected to whistle-blower allegations. I suspect that this percentage has been increasing steadily over the last few years, but 25% !!! That certainly registers on the “take-notice” meter.

I also listened to a TechLaw10 podcast #42 this week, where Jonathan Armstrong was talking about the many challenges of internal investigations… more regulations, businesses being more global, more value on corporate data, more employee turnover. This last one certainly resonated – the work force of today statistically averages 2.2 years per company, a far cry from our Dads’ generation when jobs were for life. Whether people today are stealing corporate secrets more than they were before is not the issue; but the chance of this happening is significantly higher simply because people move around more and it is much easier to ‘take’ secret data with you.

All put together, I sense the perfect storm brewing to corroborate this trend of increasing investigations.

So to the people who actually have to do the work and respond to this trend, my question is how are you coping? In this economy it is not simply a case of asking General Counsel for a bigger budget – more people and more technology. It’s more complicated than that. It requires putting together a well thought out “mini-business plan” – what are the key areas of focus, how do you prioritize investigations, when and how do you deploy resources (locally and internationally), what policies and processes do you have to train and educate employees, etc. And of course if additional resources are required they need to be justified via an ROI calculation. This last piece is absolutely key – coming from the sales side, believe me, sales commission are directly proportional to a customer’s ROI.

Faced with an increase in internal investigations, the key is to use technology to your advantage – at Catelas, we are all about upfront intelligence – arming you with the facts about a case as early as possible, so that you can prioritize your investigations, spending time on the important, not the trivial, one’s, collecting only the relevant data specific to that investigation and thereby saving time and cost per investigation.

If you are interested in learning more, look here.